How To Choose The Right Plantation Shutters?

There are many things required to make a home look beautiful from inside. Some of the elements are just for decoration, while some also serve a practical or real purpose. It would not be wrong to say that the plantation shutters are one of them. Used mainly for windows, these shutters are quite classy in appearance and also provide a good amount of privacy. In fact, these shutters prove to be an excellent alternative for window curtains, and sometimes they are also referred to as blinds.

Window Plantation Shutter

Since these shutters are no longer used just for the purpose of privacy or blocking the sunlight, therefore it is important that one should put into a considerable amount of thought behind the selection. Nowadays, there are a number of options available in the market when it comes to purchasing shutters for windows and even doors. From the economical shutters to the stylish ones, you can pick them as per your budget and décor of your home’s interior. But the question is- how to make the right plantation shutter? Let’s find out.

The selection process explained

The selection is important because if you end up choosing a wrong one that it will not only affect the look of your home, but it may also cost you a lot. Some shutters demand high maintenance, while some are fragile in nature. In the present time, there is a wide range of materials to choose from. However, the most popular ones are aluminium, poplar, basswood, and PVC. Initially, the shutters were made from hardwoods; but as technology improved, new materials were included in the manufacturing of window shutters. Each material has certain characteristics and it is important to know them:

Window Plantation Shutter
    • PVC: Also known as Poly Vinyl Chloride, this material is more affordable. Being a highly popular synthetic polymer, the shutters made from this material are light in weight and somewhat durable as well.
    • Basswood: If you are looking for timber that is highly durable in nature then you must go with this option. As a matter of fact, basswood is also known by the name lime timber. Another major characteristic of lime timber is its softness. For a classy look, basswood can be a perfect material for the shutters. It is suitable for outside.
    • Aluminium: If you want metal based plantation shutter for your home then aluminium can prove to be an apt option. Apart from being light in weight, aluminium made shutters are also very durable. Moreover, aluminium does not come with the issue of rusting; therefore, if you live in a coastal region or where the humidity level remains pretty high then you must go for the aluminium option.
    • Poplar: If you are not looking for soft timber then popular is the best choice for the shutters. Mainly used in furniture, poplar is a very hard kind of timber and it is also quite brittle in nature. No doubt, plantation shutters made from poplar are very attractive in nature. But, it is also a little bit costlier than PVC and aluminium. However, this material is not suitable for outside.

If we talk about the maintenance part, aluminium is the best material as it requires a minimum amount of maintenance. While PVC and basswood need simple dusting on regular basis, you have to take great care of popular material. Coming to the durability aspect, like we mentioned above, aluminium is the most durable among all, so is basswood. However, PVC and popular are not as impressive as the other two materials. Colour options in aluminium and PVC are quite a many, whereas limited in the case of poplar and basswood. So, choose your option accordingly.

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